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The Gospels in Perfect Harmony J. Clontz

The Gospels in Perfect Harmony

J. Clontz

Published July 30th 2013
ISBN :
Kindle Edition
500 pages
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 About the Book 

The chronological order of events in this harmony is based on an engineering analysis of the foundational chronology of the four modern gospels using precedence diagramming, linear programming, and theory of constraints. The results of theMoreThe chronological order of events in this harmony is based on an engineering analysis of the foundational chronology of the four modern gospels using precedence diagramming, linear programming, and theory of constraints. The results of the engineering analysis were compared to the surviving ancient harmony manuscripts. Only one harmony manuscript, MS Pepys 2498, was discovered to provide a chronological match to the engineering analysis. MS Pepys 2498 is the only surviving manuscript record of the original chronology underlying the four modern gospels.MS Pepys 2498 contains chronological information that does not exist in the modern gospels. The unique chronological information in MS Pepys 2498 was used to resolve the precise chronological relationships necessary to restore the two parables of the Lamp in Luke 8 and 11 into a single parable as indicated by the engineering analysis. MS Pepys 2498 is one of only two documents known to contain the event where Jesus appears to Peter after the resurrection. MS Pepys 2498 contained the text with the appearance to Peter at exactly the same location identified in the engineering analysis as the point of textual omission. The only other manuscript that contains the appearance to Peter is Syriac S.MS Pepys 2498 has many textual similarities to the Memoirs (Remembrances) of the Apostles used by Justin Martyr in his Dialogue with Trypho c. 150 AD. The textual similarities between MS Pepys 2498 and the Memoirs (Remembrances) of the Apostles include an agrapha that disappeared in the second century and is located by MS Pepys 2498 in Luke 3:18. Only Justin Martyr, Josephus (Hegessipus) c. 150 and MS Pepys 2498 employ the same missing agrapha. Both Justin Martyr and Hegessipus are believed to have used Syriac gospel harmonies which may have contained the agrapha.According to Papias, Matthew authored a record of Jesus in Syriac that was interpreted by the other apostles. Eusebius, Origen, and Jerome had access to a Syriac gospel. Jerome stated that he believed the Syriac gospel that he saw was the original gospel. Jerome also stated that he translated the Syriac gospel into both Greek and Latin [a claim disputed by modern scholars]. Hegessipus, Justin Martyr, and Jerome are all possible translators of a Syriac gospel harmony into Latin. MS Pepys 2498 is in Middle English and is translated from French which appears to have been translated from Latin. Ultimately MS Pepys 2498 appears to be a gospel harmony that has been through several translations and has unique parallels to textual documents of Syriac origin that disappeared before 400 AD.John 2:22 and 16:12 possibly indicate the existence of a text that was a collaborative effort by the disciples after the resurrection to remember the words and events in the life of Jesus. If such a text existed and was in Syriac then MS Pepys 2498 is possibly the last surviving transmission of that textual tradition. The chronology of MS Pepys 2498 may represent the chronology that was remembered by the disciples and was the original chronological foundation for the events in the four gospels.Moreover, Hegessipus, Justin Martyr, and Jerome all had access to an ancient Syriac gospel that either they or one of their followers may have translated into Latin. The ancient Syriac gospel was believed to have been based on a record of the life of Jesus created collaboratively by the disciples after the resurrection. The Latin translation of the ancient Syriac gospel was then translated into French and then from French into Middle English as MS Pepys 2498. MS Pepys 2498 was then identified as the only ancient gospel harmony that matched an engineering analysis of the original chronology of the four modern gospels.